Help promote the book on Twitter or Amazon to win a Kindle! (Writing Contest)

Historical savior or fictional character Who do YOU think Jesus was?

big eBook cover

We’ve decided to run one last contest to get some comments on amazon.com. The rules are simple and you don’t need to buy the book to participate. Just post a review on the amazon page before May 28th. Every comment is automatically entered. There are no restrictions for the comments – except that you please read the book (or the content on this site) before posting a review. You don’t need to leave a 5-star review if you didn’t like the book. A critical review is better than no review. The winner will be the comment that gets the most votes using amazon’s “Was this review helpful to you?” voting system. On May 28th, the winner will be the comment with the most “likes”

How to enter:

1) Get a copy of the book. You can buy one on amazon.com, kindle, or download the free review copy by clicking here.

2) Post a review on amazon.com before May 28th.

3) Post a comment on this page with your amazon.com username. We need to have a way to find you if you win. If you use our comment system we should have enough information to get in touch with you, either by email or some form of social media. You could also just copy and paste your amazon comment.

That’s it! Of course we also need your support to get the word out. Please help us out by spreading the news.

Please Like, Tweet, or Share!





  • Anbondi

    When I had just read the title of this book, “Jesus Potter Harry Christ”, I was expecting a piece dripping with satire. I remembered my high school history class when our teacher had us read Jonathon Swift’s “A Modest Proposal”, and he chuckled as a few students became outraged over Swift’s proposal that the impoverished Irish people sell their infants to the wealthy as food. I got excited at the prospect of reading a modern-day Swiftian satire. I imagined the book shocking and outraging people by likening Jesus Christ with Harry Potter, and yet, having underlying success in creating an analogy of both as literary characters.

    I will admit, I was somewhat disappointed to find that Murphy was taking a calculated, empirical approach to his argument, but he is still very successful in showing how both Christ (like Potter) evolved as a literary hero.

    “Jesus Potter Harry Christ” isn’t a satirical piece, or a social critique, but it will enlighten you in understanding the history of the Christian religion. Murphy’s approach is thorough, and scholarly. By comparing Jesus to Harry Potter, the piece becomes very timely and relevant. It isn’t a quick read, but it is quite interesting and will change the way you look at Christianity’s development of a heroic figure.

  • Anbondi

    When I had just read the title of this book, “Jesus Potter Harry Christ”, I was expecting a piece dripping with satire. I remembered my high school history class when our teacher had us read Jonathon Swift’s “A Modest Proposal”, and he chuckled as a few students became outraged over Swift’s proposal that the impoverished Irish people sell their infants to the wealthy as food. I got excited at the prospect of reading a modern-day Swiftian satire. I imagined the book shocking and outraging people by likening Jesus Christ with Harry Potter, and yet, having underlying success in creating an analogy of both as literary characters.

    I will admit, I was somewhat disappointed to find that Murphy was taking a calculated, empirical approach to his argument, but he is still very successful in showing how both Christ (like Potter) evolved as a literary hero.

    “Jesus Potter Harry Christ” isn’t a satirical piece, or a social critique, but it will enlighten you in understanding the history of the Christian religion. Murphy’s approach is thorough, and scholarly. By comparing Jesus to Harry Potter, the piece becomes very timely and relevant. It isn’t a quick read, but it is quite interesting and will change the way you look at Christianity’s development of a heroic figure.